How to Map a Network Drive in Windows 10

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map network drive

You can easily create a shortcut to another drive or folder shared on your network by mapping that location. When you map a network drive, it will show up as a new drive under This PC in File Explorer, so you can quickly access the shared files you need, just like you would your local hard drive. Here's how to make that network drive shortcut in Windows 10.

1. Open File Explorer and select This PC.

2. Click  the Map network drive button in the ribbon menu at the top, then select "Map network drive." (This is under the Computer tab, which should open automatically when you go to This PC, as above.)
hit map button

3. Select the drive letter you want to use for the network folder, then hit Browse.

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map network drive

4. Navigate to the folder you want to map and hit OK after selecting it.
select folder

5. Confirm your selection and click Finish. You can choose to reconnect to the folder every time you sign in so it's always available to you and, if needed, use a different user account to connect to the folder.

When you're done, you should see the new drive letter under This PC and will be able to access its contents like you would any other folder. If you want to disconnect the network drive, right-click on it and select "Disconnect."

 

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8 comments
  • Ludivina Says:

    Hello!
    I have a winows 10 home basic 1511, I'm trying to map a network drive to a Server on the WAN.
    I followed the next procedure:
    I selected “This PC”,
    right-click,
    map network drive,
    drive z:,
    folder \\158.69.216.xxx\publico
    mark another credentials
    finish
    user pcname\username
    pwd password

    This procedure Works in Windows 7, windows8, Windows server, etc. Except in Windows 10 (WAN Server)
    It works fine in a local LAN server.
    But I need to map the network drive in a wan server.
    Any idea please
    :)

  • Hello Purch Says:

    You can easily create a shortcut to another drive or folder shared on your network by mapping that location. When you map a network drive, it will show up as a new drive under This PC in File Explorer, so you can quickly access the shared files you need, just like you would your local hard drive. Here's how to make that network drive shortcut in Windows 10.

    1. Open File Explorer and select This PC.

    2. Click the Map network drive button in the ribbon menu at the top, then select "Map network drive." (This is under the Computer tab, which should open automatically when you go to This PC, as above.)

    Nope. Step 1, no problem. Step 2: no such option.

  • Aboulfath Fekri Says:

    i could make net drive but in the folder i can not see the access database fie .
    i saw it before but after i disconnected it and made again , i could not see that.
    please help that

  • Bette Says:

    Break Step 1 into two steps. Each step should be 1 action. Therefore, the first two steps should be:
    1. Open File Explorer
    2. Select This PC

    Also, the pic that illustrates these steps should be immediately above or below the instructions; not separated by another paragraph.

    As you can see by the comments, this seems to be a problem with many people. Otherwise, the steps worked perfectly.

  • chris Says:

    This works in a, "Local," account but does not work if you are logged in with a a Microsoft account!

  • Frank Kirschner Says:

    Doesn't work. There is no Computer tab, and there is no Map Network Drive option under the tabs that are there.

  • Frank Kirschner Says:

    Doesn't work. There is no Computer tab, and there is no Map Network Drive option under the tabs that are there.

  • Bhattacharya Says:

    When I map a drive on a Mac (that's using SMB to share), Win 10 makes all files and folders on that drive Read-Only!! This is an obvious bug and none of the numerous solutions found on the Web work. Microsoft needs to fix this but shows no interest in fixing anything!! Win 10 is a pathetically buggy product that has been unleashed on unsuspecting users, without proper testing. Shame on Microsoft, although we all know Microsoft has no shame -- they release buggy software all the time for users to debug their software for them.

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