This Year's MacBooks Will Have Apple-Made Chips

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Apple's 2018 suite of MacBooks and Mac desktops will feature the company's T-series processors, according to a report from Bloomberg

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Those chips are primarily security-based, but also have a few other functions. The T1 chip on the latest MacBook Pros controls Touch ID and the Touch Bar. On the iMac Pro, the T2 manages the boot process, camera, microphone security and more.

Apple has been turning into a quiet chip powerhouse these last several years, with major advancements to the A-series chips in the iPhone and iPad, as well as the company's W-series silicon in its AirPods and Apple Watch (which also uses the company's S-series chip).

Right now, only the Touch Bar-based laptops and the iMac Pro have Apple's own silicon, but this year will feature at least three more machines, including updated laptops and a desktop, with Apple's own co-processors the report says. That means for now, they'll likely still have Intel CPUs. 

Many analysts have guessed for awhile that Apple will eventually build its own computer CPU and ditch Intel. That would be a big blow to Intel,  but another way for Apple to differentiate its computers from the competition.

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Author Bio
Andrew E. Freedman
Andrew E. Freedman,
Andrew joined Laptopmag.com in 2015, reviewing computers and keeping up with the latest news. He holds a M.S. in Journalism (Digital Media) from Columbia University. A lover of all things gaming and tech, his previous work has shown up in Kotaku, PCMag and Complex, among others. Follow him on Twitter @FreedmanAE.
Andrew E. Freedman, on
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2 comments
  • systemBuilder Says:

    Tim Cook is a fool if he thinks Apple is a hardware company. He is already killing iPhone by failing to innovate on the software side. His next move is to bring this failure to MacBook ....

  • Joshua Vargas Says:

    I hope the eventual Apple desktop processors are x86-64, not because I like that architecture, but because Boot Camp is one of the Mac’s greatest selling points for PC users, and not having that functionality would be a bit of a blow to the professional market imho. (There is virtualization, but that isn’t perfect)

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