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HP TouchPad Tips: Maximize Your webOS Tablet

The HP TouchPad got off to a pretty rocky start, and then things got worse. Thanks to buggy performance and a somewhat hefty design, the first tablet powered by webOS received a lukewarm reception when it was released in early July. After an initial price drop didn’t spur sales, HP decided to stop making webOS hardware altogether, which includes phones and tablets. But thanks to a subsequent price cut to just $99, there are suddenly a whole lot of people with a new TouchPad in hand.

Want to get the most out of the HP TouchPad? Follow these tips.

How to Use "Just Type" 

The Just Type bar, located near the top of the homescreen, helps you search Google, Maps, Wikipedia, Twitter, and the App Catalog. 

Multitask and Use Stacks

The HP TouchPad has a much different interface than the iPad and Android tablets, but once you get the hang of it you’ll appreciate how easy it is to multitask.

Make Skype Calls

The HP TouchPad may be a defunct product, but it still offers video conferencing via Skype that’s good enough to call your friends on other devices.

Print on the HP TouchPad

The TouchPad can print to network-capable HP printers that were made in the past 5 years or so and are available on the current Wi-Fi network.

Transfer Files to Your PC

Moving photos, music, and other files back and forth between your PC and your TouchPad is easy

Add Exhibition Apps to the HP TouchPad

webOS Exhibition is like a screen saver for your TouchPad, but better.

Customize the Menu Bar

You can swap out shortcuts on the menu bar just by dragging new apps across the screen.

Make Calls and Text on an HP TouchPad

You can use the TouchPad to make phone calls or send SMS messages as long as you are actively paired with a webOS phone.

Responsible for the editorial vision for Laptop Mag and Tom's Guide, Mark Spoonauer has been Editor in Chief of LAPTOP since 2003 and has covered technology for nearly 15 years. Mark speaks at key tech industry events and makes regular media appearances on CNBC, Fox and CNN. Mark was previously reviews editor at Mobile Computing, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc.