Huawei Ascend D2 Hands-on: Crazy-High DPI, Shrugs Off Water

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Huawei's Ascend Mate is getting all the attention because it has a ginormous 6.1-inch display, but to us the Ascend D2 looks like the better of the two phones here at CES 2013. Why? Because it crams 1080p resolution into a 5-inch display, giving this phone a crazy high 443 DPI. That's higher than the iPhone 5 (326) and most Android handsets. The HTC Droid DNA is a comparable 440 ppi.

The Ascend D2 has a lot of other things going for it, including IPX water resistance. In fact, during a demo Huawei dunked the phone in a tank then took it out, and it just kept on working.This smartphone features a sharp and fast 13-MP camera, as well as a 3000mAh battery that's nearly as beefy as what you'll find in the Motorola Droid RAZR Maxx HD. Plus, Huawei promises that its power saving technologies will save you 20 percent juice in standby mode.

In the hand, we like the D2's slightly curved metal frame, but at 6 ounces it's about an ounce heavier than the Droid DNA. However, both phones have equally thin profiles at 0.4 inches. Did we notice the dpi advantage? Not at first glance, but we also didn't get a lot of time to view HD content.

Other features of the Ascend D2 include swift sharing, which is supposed to be faster than Samsung's S Share for its Galaxy devices. You'll also find a super hands-free function that is designed to let multiple people listen in on a call within a 5-foot radius.

The Ascend D2 will be available in January in China and then Japan. No word yet on a U.S. release.

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Author Bio
Mark Spoonauer
Mark Spoonauer, LAPTOP Editor in Chief
Responsible for the editorial vision for Laptop Mag and Tom's Guide, Mark Spoonauer has been Editor in Chief of LAPTOP since 2003 and has covered technology for nearly 15 years. Mark speaks at key tech industry events and makes regular media appearances on CNBC, Fox and CNN. Mark was previously reviews editor at Mobile Computing, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc.
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