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Tablet World Series Game 5: ExoPC Slate vs. Archos 101, Voting Ends 10/28 at 12:00 a.m.

Welcome to the final four of the first annual Tablet World Series. As we enter the second phase of the playoffs, we match the ExoPC Slate against the Archos 101. Which one will swing for the fences and which one will strike out? That will depend on your votes. Let's cut to our scouting reports.

The ExoPC Slate really threw a wicked curve when it shut out Apple's iPad in Game 1, taking home more than 77 percent of the vote. This 2.1-pound relative unknown features Windows 7 with a custom user interface loaded with tiny discs/shortcuts to menu screens or to apps themselves. The 11.6-inch screen offers 1366 x 768-pixels of capacitive touchscreen. The interior is loaded with 2GB of RAM and either a 32GB or 64GB SSD. The ExoPC people claim 5 hours of battery life. There's no GPS and Windows 7 isn't known to be great for tablets. So, can it send home the more established Archos with its new 101?

Update: The ExoPC Slate Has Won by a Hair

Archos 101 blew out Viewsonic's G-Tablet in Game 3, relying on support of more than 87 percent of the fans. At $299, this 8GB Android 2.2 tablet looks good on the mound. Even the 16GB version, which will run you $349, ain't half bad. Both versions sport a 1-GHz ARM Cortex A8 CPU and a 10.1-inch (1024 x 600 pixel) capacitive touchscreen. The built-in kickstand is also nice. And it's tough to beat 10 hours of battery life and HDMI output. But, without the Android Market's availability at release, apps are a tougher sell here.

So which is the better tablet? You decide by voting below. Then check back at 10 a.m. (EST) on 10/28/2010 for Game 6.

[polldaddy poll=3969803]

A lover of lists and deadlines, Anna Attkisson covers apps, social networking, tablets, chromebooks and accessories. She loves each of her devices equally, including the phablet, three tablets, three laptops and desktop. She joined the Laptop Mag staff in 2007, after working at Time Inc. Content Solutions where she created custom publications for companies from American Express to National Parks Foundation.