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Is Logitech charging more for ‘gender-inclusive’ PC gaming accessories?

Logitech Aurora Collection
(Image credit: Logitech)

Logitech dropped the Aurora Collection: a series of PC gaming accessories in a range of colors that are designed to be gender inclusive. But that inclusivity comes at a steep price, and we’re getting some serious “pink tax” vibes from these.

This range includes keyboards, mice, a gaming headset, and a recoloring of the Blue Yeti Mic to match. While this sounds like a positive step for peripheral design, we’ve spotted some problems — namely that becoming “inclusive” has translated into higher-priced items with smaller batteries.

Pretty, but pricey

A good example of this comes in the $200 G715 (opens in new tab) and $170 G713 (opens in new tab) gaming keyboards, which pack per-key RGB lighting, a selection of three GX mechanical switches (clicky, linear, or tactile) and a cloud-shaped palm rest. The G715 offers either Bluetooth or 2.4Ghz wireless connectivity with 25 hours of battery life.

Compare this to the G915 TKL (opens in new tab), which Logitech list at $230, but is always available for $200, which packs all the same tech into a slimmer, metal body and a 40-hour battery life, and you’ll understandably start to ponder why the G715 costs just as much, but offers less for your money.

(Image credit: Logitech)

For a bigger, more confusing price difference, look to the wired keyboards, as you can snap up a Pro X keyboard (opens in new tab) for $20 less than the G713. Of course, with the latter you’re getting that volume roller, but is that really worth that much extra?

There is a slight exception that proves the rule in the Logitech G735 wireless headset. It packs Blue VO!CE microphone technology that allows you to modulate your voice and an audio mixer. Inside, you’ll find a 56-hour battery life (with LEDs turned off), and both USB wireless and Bluetooth connectivity.

Sounds good on paper and at $230, it is $30 over the Logitech G Pro X (opens in new tab), which packs similar specs, but halves the battery life and lacks bluetooth.

Elsewhere, there is the G705 wireless gaming mouse (opens in new tab), which has been designed for smaller hands, but also comes with an 8K DPI sensor and 40-hour battery life for $99. This is another questionable price, as you can snap up the similarly-sized G503 (opens in new tab) with a 25K DPI for the same cost.

This all leads up to an eye watering grand total of up to $530, which you could increase by a further $150 if you purchase all the accessories, such as the G735’s $20 ear pad bundle or the $40 heart carrying case for the headset and mouse.

(Image credit: Logitech)

Logitech's take

So let's answer the key question here: is Logitech charging more for brightly colored, 'gender inclusive' gaming accessories? The answer to that is in a bit of a grey area.

We reached out to Logitech for comment, and the company understandably stood resolute behind its product line: "We set the pricing for our gaming products based on their feature sets and builds rather than the target audience."

"Our base colourway is White Mist, which expands on the current offerings in our gear. Pink Dawn and Green Flash were added additional color options to expand our customization," the Logitech representative continued. "We did extensive user testing to determine those colors and those were both the front runners from our community."

While there are some differences in the feature sets for sure, such as the patented LIGHTSPEED wireless connectivity, some of them seem to be compromises for the Aurora Collection, such as a weaker battery life for the G715. 

We'll let you form your own opinion about this, but like many PC gaming peripherals, my first piece of advice will be to always wait for a sales event. They are always discounted!

Jason England
Jason England

 Jason brings a decade of tech and gaming journalism experience to his role as a writer at Laptop Mag. He takes a particular interest in writing articles and creating videos about laptops, headphones and games. He has previously written for Kotaku, Stuff and BBC Science Focus. In his spare time, you'll find Jason looking for good dogs to pet or thinking about eating pizza if he isn't already.