Skip to main content

Dell CEO says chip shortage will last a few more years: What that means for you

Dell XPS 13 (Model 9310, 4K) review
(Image credit: Laptop Mag)

In a recent conversation with German newspaper Handelsblatt, Dell founder and CEO Michael Dell discussed the chip shortages currently affecting the tech industry as a whole. Dell stated, "The shortage will probably continue for a few years. Even if chip factories are built all over the world, it takes time." 

Chip shortages are impacting multiple industries, from computers to gaming consoles and the auto industry; the short supply is causing major upheaval as major corporations try to produce enough chips for their products. Sony recently announced that the PS5 would remain in short supply through 2022 as chip shortages affect the tech giant's ability to build enough units to meet demand. 

The Dell CEO further explained, "We are talking, in particular, about components that are in the one-dollar range and are used practically everywhere. But even newer technologies are not easy to come by." 

Having spoken to others in the industry, several makers have admitted to scrambling to not only find chips but other components for their devices since the Covid-19 pandemic began. Several companies told us they were doing all they could to keep up with product demand while working hard to innovate. 

Recently, Nvidia CFO Colette Kress said, "demand continues to exceed supply for much of this year." With chip maker TSMC warning that shortages could last long into 2022, consumers could be hard-pressed to get their hands on new tech or even have access to goods they use daily. 

Earlier today, in a move to combat the current global shortages, tech giants Microsoft, Apple, Google, General Electric, Hewlett Packard Enterprises, Amazon, and others announced they were forming the Semiconductors in America Coalition, intending to secure funding with the help of the U.S. government to start producing chips in the United States. 

As reported by Windows Central, SIAC's main objective is to promote the manufacturing of semiconductors in the U.S. and "secure funding for the CHIPS for America Act." The newly formed coalition already sent a letter to leaders in the U.S. Congress to support U.S. President Biden's call for $50 billion to fund semiconductor manufacturing incentives and research in conjunction with the CHIPS for America Act.