Lunar Lake leak hints revolutionary integrated graphics for thin and light laptops

Close up shot of an Intel chip
(Image credit: Intel)

While Intel Core Ultra chips just arrived last December, the next-gen Intel Core Ultra chips are already doing the rumor rounds and thanks to leaker @miktdt on X, we may have a glimpse at the improved integrated graphics performance. This leak, centered on a pre-release HP Spectre x360 laptop featuring the Intel Lunar Lake CPU (codenamed Intel Core Ultra 200V), is significant for a few reasons.

Intel's Arc GPUs in the latest Intel Core Ultra laptops delivered a major jump in performance compared to the previous Iris Xe offerings. However, the leaked information suggests that Intel's next-generation integrated graphics could offer yet another exponential leap in performance. 

Benchmark breakdown

The leaked benchmark showcases what could be a big jump in integrated graphics, achieving a noteworthy 2,108 Mpix/s (millions of pixels per second). That's outperforming options like the Ryzen Z1 Extreme found in the Asus ROG Ally and Lenovo Legion Go, but critically doing so with a chip drawing just 17W of power compared to up to 30W for those AMD options. 

Benchmarked on the SiSoftware platform showcase the integrated Intel Arc graphics solution within the Lunar Lake chip. With 56 Execution Units (EUs) clocked at 1.75GHz. This seemingly backs up Intel's claims of doubling graphics performance compared to their previous generation, Meteor Lake, marking a significant leap for integrated graphics.

It's important to remember this is a pre-release sample with a potentially cut-down GPU. Rumors suggest the final Lunar Lake chip might boast 8 Xe Cores, potentially leading to even better performance.

The competition is heating up

While Intel's Xe2 Battlemage looks promising, the laptop CPU market promises to be a battleground this year. Qualcomm's Snapdragon X Elite (and Plus) processors, which could arrive in laptops as early as June 2024, offer a compelling alternative. 

While these ARM-based CPUs used to rely on emulation for x86 software, Microsoft and many developers have worked diligently to create native versions of their applications to run on the ARM-based Qualcomm chipsets. I recently got a hands-on with a Snapdragon X Elite laptop running Davinici Resolve and it worked beautifully. 

AMD isn't sitting idly either. Its Strix Point CPUs, expected later this year, are poised to challenge Intel's dominance in the laptop CPU market. Strix Point Halo, rumored to be an even more powerful iteration, is expected to arrive in 2025.

These advancements in integrated graphics paint a picture where thin-and-light laptops can comfortably handle demanding applications and even modern games. While dedicated graphics cards will remain the domain of hardcore gamers, and workstations. 

Final Thoughts

The leaked Lunar Lake benchmarks suggest a bright future for integrated graphics. While dedicated graphics cards won't disappear completely for hardcore gamers, the options for casual gamers and everyday users seeking portability are about to expand significantly. 

With Intel's Xe2 Battlemage, Qualcomm's Snapdragon X Elite, and AMD's Strix Point all vying for dominance, 2024 could be a landmark year for powerful and versatile thin-and-light laptops and the emerging handheld gaming PC market.

More from Laptop Mag

Category
Arrow
Arrow
Back to Apple MacBook Pro
Brand
Arrow
Processor
Arrow
RAM
Arrow
Storage Size
Arrow
Screen Size
Arrow
Colour
Arrow
Condition
Arrow
Price
Arrow
Any Price
Showing 10 of 148 deals
Filters
Arrow
Load more deals
Mark Anthony Ramirez

Mark has spent 20 years headlining comedy shows around the country and made appearances on ABC, MTV, Comedy Central, Howard Stern, Food Network, and Sirius XM Radio. He has written about every topic imaginable, from dating, family, politics, social issues, and tech. He wrote his first tech articles for the now-defunct Dads On Tech 10 years ago, and his passion for combining humor and tech has grown under the tutelage of the Laptop Mag team. His penchant for tearing things down and rebuilding them did not make Mark popular at home, however, when he got his hands on the legendary Commodore 64, his passion for all things tech deepened. These days, when he is not filming, editing footage, tinkering with cameras and laptops, or on stage, he can be found at his desk snacking, writing about everything tech, new jokes, or scripts he dreams of filming.