Acer's Predator Triton Neo 16 has Intel Ultra-gaming potential in store for 2024

Acer Predator Triton Neo 16
(Image credit: Acer)

Acer’s Predator Triton laptops never fail to impress, just check out our hands-on impressions of the Predator Triton 16 from Computex 2023 for proof. Similarly to how Acer’s gaming laptop wowed us back in June, the brand looks set to deliver yet another compelling gaming platform in the form of the Predator Triton Neo 16.

The Acer Predator Triton Neo 16 might have the name of an obscure anime, but there’s nothing cartoonish about the performance it’s willing to offer. With an upgraded processor, powerful RTX 40-Series graphics on-hand, and a dazzling 3.2K 16-inch display with a solid refresh rate (backed by Nvidia’s Advanced Optimus and G-Sync tech), Acer looks set to deliver a phenomenal gaming experience. Let’s take a closer look at what to expect when this laptop hits store shelves in 2024.

Acer Predator Triton Neo 16

Technical Specs

Price: $1,499 (starting)
Release Date: March, 2024
Display: 16-inch, up to WQXGA (3200 x 2000), 165Hz
CPU: up to Intel Core Ultra 9
GPU: up to Nvidia GeForce RTX 4070
RAM: up to 32GB
Storage: up to 2TB SSD  

Power, performance, ports, and presentation: Acer delivers on all fronts with the Predator Triton Neo 16. The next laptop to take the Predator Triton moniker is in no danger of sullying its good name and adopts some cutting edge components to ensure it’s up there with the best of them.

Beneath the hood of this gaming gem lies one of Intel’s latest Core Ultra processors, available in Ultra 9, Ultra 7, and Ultra 5 configurations. These processors are big on performance and efficiency, with a new NPU (Neural Processing Unit) lightening the load of your CPU and GPU when it comes to complex tasks involving machine learning or AI.

This allows the Intel Core Ultra processor housed within to more effectively manage its workload to deliver maximum performance at all times. Not only that, your GPU won’t be busy shouldering any additional number crunching either, meaning you can squeeze the utmost of visual potential out of the Predator Triton’s impressive Nvidia GeForce RTX 40-Series graphics including the DLSS 3.5 AI-optimized enhancements available for games and creator applications.

Acer Predator Triton Neo 16

(Image credit: Acer)

If you’re looking for the right gaming laptop to tackle a burgeoning and ever-demanding Steam library then the Predator Triton Neo 16 is more than worthy of a spot on your shortlist. Not only is the Predator Triton Neo a fantastic choice for tackling even the latest AAA titles, but they’ll look incredible on this laptop’s 3.2K panel.

The 16-inch display has been Calman-Verified to produce true-to-life cinematic colors to help deliver vivid and accurate pictures at all times. Not only that, but thanks to a generous 165Hz refresh rate the action on screen will be buttery-smooth, sharp, and tear-free thanks to support for Nvidia’s Advanced Optimus and G-Sync tech.

The Predator Triton Neo 16 will be available across North America from March 2024 with prices starting at just $1,499.

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Rael Hornby
Content Editor

Rael Hornby, potentially influenced by far too many LucasArts titles at an early age, once thought he’d grow up to be a mighty pirate. However, after several interventions with close friends and family members, you’re now much more likely to see his name attached to the bylines of tech articles. While not maintaining a double life as an aspiring writer by day and indie game dev by night, you’ll find him sat in a corner somewhere muttering to himself about microtransactions or hunting down promising indie games on Twitter.