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PS5, Xbox Series X reliant on AMD chips — Will they be delayed like Intel?

(Image credit: AMD)

With Intel experiencing significant delays with its 7-nanometer chips, many are wondering if AMD will suffer the same fate. With the PS5 and Xbox Series X being reliant on AMD's processors and graphics cards, an AMD delay could cause a troublesome domino effect.

But there's no need to worry. During a Q2 earnings call, AMD CEO Lisa Su announced that many of its highly anticipated product releases are still on schedule for 2020, including its 7nm CPUs based on Zen 3 architecture and its RDNA 2 GPUs, The Verge reported.

AMD's edge over Intel is execution

Throwing a little shade at Intel, Su said, "We consistently executed on our product road maps."

In an interview with CRN, an executive who partners with Intel and AMD said,  “If you look at AMD now, their next generation is well on its way. I‘ve got some customers looking at that, and here’s Intel just losing ground. It makes selling the Intel story a little tougher."

With AMD's ability to execute and fulfill its product roadmap plans, PlayStation fans needn't worry about their precious PS5 console being subject to setbacks due to AMD's stagnation. The next-gen console will feature a custom AMD Zen 2 CPU as well as a custom RDNA 2 GPU.

The same can be said for fans of the Xbox Series X, which will also feature a custom AMD Zen 2 CPU and a custom RDNA 2 GPU. Xbox fans can rest easy knowing that AMD is on track to release all of its planned 2020 products as scheduled.

Fraught with production woes and executive departures -- the most recent one being Chief Engineering Officer Murthy Renduchintala -- Intel is beginning to lose its solid grip on the SoC industry.

In the meantime, AMD's spotlight is growing brighter. Su expressed that AMD's Ryzen 4000 laptop processors are, in part, responsible for the megacorp's growth surge. 

As AMD continues to win over device manufacturers and customers, we're curious to see whether AMD can continue its upward trajectory to semiconductor stardom.