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New iCloud for Windows App Is a Huge Win for iPhone Users

Windows laptop users who own Apple devices and rely on iCloud just received a new killer app.

The app comes courtesy of a partnership between Microsoft and Apple, who have been working together to create a new iCloud app that makes it easier for PC users who own Apple products to store and access files.  You can download the new iCloud app for free from the Microsoft Store today. 

Credit: Microsoft

In a blog post, Microsoft says that the new iCloud app uses the same technology that powers OneDrive's Files On-Demand feature, which lets you access files without having to fully download them. Instead, a placeholder is downloaded and files are only completely downloaded when a folder is marked for sync. This saves you valuable disk space on your Windows PC.

Other benefits of the revamped app are that it will let you access files directly from File Explorer, and easily retrieve photos, videos, mail, calendar, files and other information from your iCloud account on the go. Conversely, you can store files in iCloud Drive from the File Explorer then access them on your iOS device, Mac or on iCloud.com. The new iCloud for Windows app also supports collaboration, so you can make edits to a file and they'll be synced across all of your devices. 

The previous version of iCloud for Windows was plagued with problems. Most notably, a flaw in the app prevented users who had installed the latest Windows release from updating shared photos albums. 

It's nice to see two formerly bitter rivals collaborate to create something that benefits customers who aren't loyal to one brand.

Phillip Tracy is a senior writer at Tom's Guide and Laptop Mag, where he reviews laptops and covers the latest industry news. After graduating with a journalism degree from the University of Texas at Austin, Phillip became a tech reporter at the Daily Dot. There, he wrote reviews for a range of gadgets and covered everything from social media trends to cybersecurity. Prior to that, he wrote for RCR Wireless News and NewBay Media. When he's not tinkering with devices, you can find Phillip playing video games, reading, listening to indie music or watching soccer.