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The Best Mac Apps That Also Work with iOS

One of the best reasons to get a MacBook Air or MacBook Pro is that they work effortlessly with your iOS devices. There are a ton of great iPhone and iPad apps that are also available on macOS, allowing you to enjoy seamless productivity.

So whether you're looking to get things done with to-do apps and word processors, or find the right calendar app to replace Apple's meager built-in option, here are the best macOS apps with iOS counterparts.

Credit: 1password

Things

Things

An award-winning productivity powerhouse, Things is one of the most obvious apps for cross-platform usage. Ideas for tasks and projects can strike you at any time, so you shouldn't need to have a specific device to manage your lists and keep track of your actionable items. Also, Things is a beautiful-looking app, with fluid animations and a simple-yet-elegant interface that won an Apple Design Award in 2017. Credit: Cultured Code GmbH & Co. KG

Bear

Bear

Sure, you could sync your writing across all of your devices with Google Docs, but its iOS apps are terrible, and are prone to constant crashing. Instead, use Bear, a lightweight text editor with its own file-management system that uses a series of nested hashtags to help organize your work. One of its top features is support for the Markdown formatting syntax, which allows you to use inline characters for formatting your text, which will disappear when you convert to HMTL, RTF and any format you want. Not only can you work on Bear on your MacBook, iPhone and iPad, its Apple Watch app also supports note-taking via audio recording. Credit: Shiny Frog Ltd.

1Password

1Password

Password recycling isn't just lazy and dangerous: it's also easily avoidable. With 1Password running on your MacBook and iPhone, your complex passwords are just a look or touch away, as the app supports both Face ID and Touch ID. Once in a while, though, you'll need to remember the master password (hence the name) that you use to unlock the app, which will then make long, complicated and hard-to-crack passwords for you. Also, it's one of the supported apps for Password Autofill, so it fits into your workflows as well as Apple's own iCloud Keychain. Credit: 1password

Due

Due

Reminders are important, but not exactly powerful. Due, on the other hand, will nag the ever-loving heck out of you until you check off that you've finished your project. Reminders that repeat may sound a bit extra to you, but having Due on your MacBook means its notifications don't just live on your phone, where you can ignore them if you're focused on work. Also, Due imports reminders from Apple's Reminders app, so you can set up Due with Siri commands. Credit: Due

Deliveries

Deliveries

If you're a rampant online shopper — or someone sending a lot of packages — Deliveries is an app that can give you a bird's-eye view. Supporting most major shipping companies, Deliveries provides you with updates on the progress your shipment, with notifications for impediments and successful deliveries. It was especially useful for me during the holiday season, providing awareness on gifts I had going out to friends across the country. Credit: Junecloud

Fantastical 2

Fantastical 2

Checking your calendar on the Mac should be easier, and the menu bar widget for Fantastical 2 takes care of this issue. Rather than having a whole app window that you need to launch whenever you need to skim your schedule, you just tap that button for a drop-down calendar view. You can even paste copied text into this miniature view of Fantastical, and the app will create an event, naturally parsing the words you dropped in. Factor in support for all of the major calendar services (iCloud, Google, Microsoft Exchange, Yahoo and more), and you'll never go back to Apple's Calendars app. Credit: Flexibits

Reeder 3

Reeder 3

RSS readers are almost going out of style, but Reeder is still getting updates, even in 2018. Not only will you love its clean, minimalist design, but it's got a dark mode, so it can fit right in with the rest of macOS Mojave's other low-light apps. Also, it supports everything from Feeder (which picked up Google Reader users when that service croaked) to current popular choice Inoreader. Credit: Silvio Rizzi

TweetBot

TweetBot

Twitter has been cutting off third-party Twitter clients at the knees by taking away access to notifications and APIs, but TweetBot's still with a download, especially on the Mac. Not only does it look better than any other version of Twitter on the macOS (sorry, Twitterriffic), but its mute system is leagues beyond the tools offered by Twitter itself. Also, it earns its spot in our list with its iCloud sync, which allows its Mac and iOS versions to stay at the same place in your timeline, so you don't miss a tweet. Credit: Tapbots

Airmail

Airmail

Airmail is a beloved iOS mail client for a number of reasons, starting with how it lets you treat individual email messages. Unlike Apple's mail client, Airmail allows you to share emails between apps, so you can create meetings and reminders from the messages you receive, rather than having to build them from scratch. Airmail also makes it easier to scan your inbox and folder for specific senders, as each email is given a profile icon, such as JetBlue's logo or your contact's Gmail avatar. Its 2018 updates include a redesigned search and a dark-mode theme for macOS Mojave. Credit: Bloop

Donut County

Donut County

An absurd tale of remote-controlled sinkholes tearing Los Angeles apart, Donut County is an utter delight. And while you might finish this game quickly, you'll keep it on your MacBook or iPhone because of its solid replay value. It starts off super-simple, moving a hole that grows as it eats items — a reverse Katamari Damacy — and it increases its complexity before you can get bored. At its hardest, you're trying to figure out the correct order of operations, as you're eating up some objects to fling at others, for a fun Rube Goldberg-style experience. Credit: Annapurna Games

Drafts

Drafts

Memory is a tricky thing, as it's way too easy to lose an idea before you realize it's gone. That's why the Drafts app on iOS lives in my bottom row, so it's easily available. Drafts believes that capturing text should be as easily as possible, so you never miss out on a great idea. Its macOS app is still in beta testing limited to Drafts Pro users. The app gives you a Menu Bar icon for Drafts, so you can start a new text capture in only two clicks. Credit: Agile Tortoise

Henry is a senior writer at Laptop Mag, covering security, Apple and operating systems. Prior to joining Laptop Mag — where he's the self-described Rare Oreo Expert — he reviewed software and hardware for TechRadar Pro, and interviewed artists for Patek Philippe International Magazine. You can find him at your local pro wrestling events, and wondering why Apple decided to ditch its MagSafe power adapters.