Lenovo ThinkPad P1 Workstation Crams Powerful Specs into Svelte Chassis

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Here at Laptop, we love the sheer power that a workstation offers. The overall weight and bulk? Not so much. But it seems that Lenovo has found a way to give consumers a lightweight system that doesn't skimp on the power with its latest workstation, the ThinkPad P1. Starting at $1,949, the P1 will be available towards the end of August.

lenovo thinkpad p1

If you were looking for some fancy new design, you won't find it here. No, the P1 has the same jet-back soft-touch finish you'll find on most ThinkPad notebooks. However, Lenovo wanted to target consumers looking for a thin-and-light system, so they managed to cram all of those powerful specs including an 8th Gen Intel Xeon Processor with up to 64GB of RAM and a Nvidia Quadro P2000 GPU into a 3.8-pound, 14.2 x 9.7 x 0.7-inch chassis. Granted it's not the slimmest as far as thin-and-lights go, but that's pretty slim for a workstation.

MORE: Best Lenovo Laptops

Other noteworthy specs include the 15.6-inch 4K (3840 x 2160) touch display that Lenovo says covers 100 percent of the Adobe color gamut and the up 4TB of M.2 SSD storage. But if you want to cut costs, you can also get a 1920 x 1080 panel.

Lenovo ThinkPad P1 3

Engineers and animators that prioritize power over dimensions will want to check out the ThinkPad P72 (starting at $1,799). Weighing in at a substantial 7.5 pounds, the 16.4 x 11.1 x 1-inch laptop offers 8th Gen Intel CPUs and up to a Nvidia Quadro P5200 GPU. The P72 offers up to double the RAM of the P1 for a whopping 128GB and up to 6TB of storage. The system also offers 16GB of Intel's Optane memory, which should deliver faster boot times, which combined with the rest of the specs makes for a serious powerhouse.

We're eager to put both systems through their paces in our lab when they arrive. Stay tuned for the full review.

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1 comment
  • tokyojerry Says:

    Do you feel such portable systems will suffice for 4K video NLE productions? i.e. BlackMagic Design's DaVinci Resolve.

    I would think that such a spec'd system should work. I prefer portability rather then returning to building DIY towers, etc. When I home I can connect to my external monitors, and if I should take on the road I have sufficient power in the portable form factor.

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