Tiggly Helps Toddlers Explore The World Through Shapes

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Tiggly allows kids to explore the world of shapes by melding the digital world with physical components.  Aimed at toddlers, Tiggly brings modern digital life into the classic children's game of matching shape block with their corresponding slots. There is a drawing app, a safari app and a matching game that helps kids develop motor skills and encourages critical thinking.

There are four shapes included with the Tiggly kit: a circle, square, triangle and star. At launch, there will be three iPad apps which use these physical shape blocks to complete missions. We played Tiggly Safari, which brought us to a farm and had us match shapes together to draw farm animals, such as pigs and owls. A single piece of the animal was drawn on the screen when we got the shape correct and if we guess wrong, we got a friendly alert and a second (or third or fourth) try.

The apps support different difficulty levels as well, the easiest allowing the shape to touch any part of the screen in order to be recognized and harder levels requiring blocks to fit specifically inside the marked section of the display. The shape components are soft and kid-safe and won't damage the iPad.

You can preorder the Tiggly shapes now for $29, and the first units will start shipping in June [Note: The website says that online orders will ship in March of 2013 but this is outdated information]. There will be three free iPad apps at launch with more apps on the way. Unfortunately, there is no word yet on Android support. 

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Dann Berg,
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