Samsung Galaxy Mega Phablets Make iPhones Look Like Tic Tacs

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There are big-screen phones, and then there's the Samsung Galaxy Mega, a new line of Android devices that will come in both 5.8-inch and 6.3-inch sizes. Samsung likely won't mind if you call the Megas phablets, as the company says it is looking to "combine the portability and convenience of a smartphone with the power, multitasking capabilities and extensive viewing experience of a tablet."

The larger-than-life Megas will launch in Europe and Russia starting in May, gradually rolling out to other parts of the world after that. 

Samsung's Mega phones share a lot of the same features as the Galaxy S4, including Air View for previewing content just by hovering your finger above the screen. You'll also find WatchOn for using the handsets as TV remote controls and S Translator for instant translations into multiple languages. Meanwhile, Group Play enables content sharing for up to 8 Galaxy devices on a Wi-Fi network.

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These certainly aren't the most powerful phones in Samsung's stable, though. While the Galaxy S4 will sport a quad-core processor in the U.S. and an octa-core CPU in other parts of the world, the Megas will feature dual-core processors. And while the S4 boasts a 13-megapixel camera, the Mega line sticks with 8-MP. However, you'll still be able to enjoy features like Sound & Shot (9 seconds of audio captured with each picture) and Drama Shot (merged continuous shots of moving subjects).

There are significant differences between the 5.8-inch Galaxy Mega and 6.3-inch version other than screen size. The bigger phablet has a faster 1.7-GHz processor, HD screen (we're assuming 720p), and 4G LTE data. It weighs a hefty 7 ounces and measures a tall but thin 6.6 x 3.5 x .31 inches. The 5.8-inch Mega is obviously the lower end model of the two, offering a 1.4-GHz CPU, lower-res qHD screen, and just HSPA+ data. The smaller Mega also has a smaller battery than the 6.3-inch version (2,600 mAh vs. 3,200 mAh).

It remains to be seen whether Americans will be willing to carry such large devices, but as Samsung proved with the 5.5-inch Galaxy Note 2, more and more shoppers are willing to stretch their fingers to get billboard-like displays.

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Mark Spoonauer
Mark Spoonauer, LAPTOP Editor in Chief
Responsible for the editorial vision for Laptop Mag and Tom's Guide, Mark Spoonauer has been Editor in Chief of LAPTOP since 2003 and has covered technology for nearly 15 years. Mark speaks at key tech industry events and makes regular media appearances on CNBC, Fox and CNN. Mark was previously reviews editor at Mobile Computing, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc.
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