Samsung to Supply iPhone 6's Screaming A8 Chip (Report)

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iPhone 6 Samsung A8 Chip

Apple and Samsung are enemies in the smartphone market -- and in the courtroom -- but that doesn't mean the two companies can't hug it out when it comes to components. Despite an earlier report claiming that TSMC would be the main supplier of the iPhone 6's purported A8 processor, a Samsung rep claims that it will be pumping out the chip too. 

The source of this claim is an anonymous Samsung official, who told ZDNet Korea that the company will be producing the CPUs in its Austin, TX facility. The A8 chip, which is to use the same 64-bit architecture as the A7 found inside the iPhone 5s, will reportedly boast both quad-core processing and graphics. That would make the iPhone 6 one of the fastest mobile devices yet.

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An earlier report from the Commercial Times of Taiwan said that TSMC (Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company) would be handling most of the orders from Apple, but this new admission from Samsung contradicts that claim.

Although not much is known about the A8, it will face fierce competition from the CPUs inside other flagship phones. The Samsung Galaxy S5, for instance, houses a new Snapdragon 801 chip, which has a quad-core Krait 400 CPU with speeds up to 2.5-GHz per core.  This processor promises much faster camera performance, in addition to 28 percent faster graphics.

Among other rumors, the iPhone 6 is also expected to feature a larger display in two sizes (4.7 inches and 5.5 or 5.7 inches), a more 10-MP advanced camera and a slimmer liquid metal design. 


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Mark Spoonauer
Mark Spoonauer, LAPTOP Editor in Chief
Responsible for the editorial vision for Laptop Mag and Tom's Guide, Mark Spoonauer has been Editor in Chief of LAPTOP since 2003 and has covered technology for nearly 15 years. Mark speaks at key tech industry events and makes regular media appearances on CNBC, Fox and CNN. Mark was previously reviews editor at Mobile Computing, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc.
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