Google Unveils Glass Apps for New York Times, Gmail, Evernote, Path

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Out of the box Google Glass will let you take pictures and video without having to whip our your smartphone, get directions and speak to send messages. But Google knows that its wearable tech won't take off unless there's an app ecosystem to support it. That's why the search giant showed off a few tantalizing examples of what's possible at the SXSW conference in Austin, with some pretty big names on board.

Want to catch up on the latest news on the go? The New York Times app for Google Glass will deliver the latest headlines to your peripheral vision along with an image. From there you can have the story read to you aloud as you walk down the street. Fans of Evernote will appreciate the Glass app that lets you capture images and save them to the Skitch service. Google is letting other social networks in, too. The Path app lets you see and comment on friends' updates; you can even add emoticons. 

Of course, Google isn't ignoring its own services. With the Gmail app you'll be able to see incoming subject lines and the sender's image, as well reply with your voice. This is in addition to the Google Plus integration in Glass that allows you to live stream whatever you're watching to a Google Hangout.

As The Verge reports, things will get really interesting once Google releases its Mirror API for Glass, enabling all sorts of developers to create their own apps. Don't be surprised to see a augmented reality app to show you which bars ban Google Glasses.

via Engadget, The Verge


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Mark Spoonauer
Mark Spoonauer, LAPTOP Editor in Chief
Responsible for the editorial vision for Laptop Mag and Tom's Guide, Mark Spoonauer has been Editor in Chief of LAPTOP since 2003 and has covered technology for nearly 15 years. Mark speaks at key tech industry events and makes regular media appearances on CNBC, Fox and CNN. Mark was previously reviews editor at Mobile Computing, and his work has appeared in Wired, Popular Science and Inc.
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